News

If you are looking for the very latest Nutkhut news, you’ve come to the right place.

The epic story of a kingdom, of exile and intrigue
and when darkness turns to light.

‘The Oil was sizzling awaiting the syrup with care,
In hopes that Jalebis soon would be there’

This Autumn, Nutkhut embarks on a unique and ambitious re-telling of the story of Diwali, making it accessible to a wider audience, yet retaining, at its heart a story of families and friends from this epic tale.

The Nutkhut team grew up with Diwali, we’ve read the epic front to back, back to front and upside down – as kids we’d boo and hiss at the baddies, at school we’d be singled out to share the story during whole school assemblies and as adults we are on a mission to make the story accessible to a wider audience.

On par with the epic Greek poem, Homer’s Illiad. We have taken little known moments of the Ramayana and applied theatrical techniques. We split between the present and the past and embark on the story at bedtime, with brothers and sisters excited and restless………………………

How are we doing it? With over 700 participants, 16 young South Asian artists, 25 elders, 8 oversized umbrellas, 2 thrones and a light sabre! An intergenerational, multi art form spectacle!

We are making lanterns, diyas and rangoli. Sourcing and creating costume, cutting and merging live and recorded music, making props and editing film and projections. Phew!

What have we been doing? Over the past few months, we’ve spent weekends and evenings supporting, mentoring and rehearsing with over 75 young people from North Kent and Bexley, both areas of low arts engagement and disadvantaged communities.

Our approach with this project has been to involve everyone – we don’t do things in halves – it’s the participants that have created the story – that have made choices and have engaged in the entirety of the key decisions. We are turning the making of theatre on its head, breaking down the hierarchies and involving and encouraging new artists, new ideas, families and young people, integrating dance, lanterns, music, projections and video mapping. We’ve brought together a small team of professionals to take the lead, who’ve been on similar Diwali journeys and very rarely get these types of opportunities, to support the process, mentor and train the participants and to ultimately develop a new generation of dedicated Diwali Makers from culturally diverse backgrounds.

When? Sat 3 Nov 4.30pm – 7pm
Where? Townley Grammar School, Kent
Cost? FREE – access, access, access is our mantra – where we can, our projects are free to public.

For more information or if you’d like to get involved please contact us via email, phone or drop in.

Remembrance Sunday 2016

Dr Blighty – ‘For those who came before’ from Nutkhut on Vimeo.

Remembrance Sunday – earlier this year Dr Blighty paid its respects to soldiers of the Empire who fought in both World War’s and conflicts which followed. These soldiers and families have largely been forgottern and do not appear in our news items, in our history books and are not taught in our schools. Culture and Art brings people together and can make a small contribution to re-address our collective memory.

A Nutkhut production co-commissioned by 14-18 NOW: WW1 Centenary Art Commissions, Brighton Festival, and Royal Pavilion & Museums, Brighton & Hove. Supported by the National Lottery through the Heritage Lottery Fund and Arts Council England, QED, and by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

1.5 Million Indian men went to war.

2,500 awoke in a palace…

‘As part of Britain’s Centenary Anniversary of the First World War Nutkhut presented an ambitious programme of immersive performances and installations based in Brighton’s Royal Pavilion Garden which bring the past into the present, immersing the audience in the untold history of these brave soldiers, so far from home, fighting the war of other men.’

Against all the odds, the ZEE London Mela returned for 2016 in a new home at Wembley Park last September! It was a huge challenge for all involved to bring the usual Mela Magic to such a new and different venue, but thanks to the hard work of some amazing people and performers – WE DID IT!

If you didn’t manage to make it this year – check out the video below, and get ready for updates for what’s to come in 2017!

At Nutkhut we love it when old meets new – so when Mike Mclean pitched to us to shoot our recent production ‘Dr Blighty’ with his 100 year old Kodak No2 Camera, we couldn’t think of a more beautiful way to shoot our contemporary production. We caught up with Mike to find out more about the project…

“This project idea came when I saw a friend, Finn Hopkin, post images from the first evenings show on social media. After reading the Brighton Festival programme information and doing some further research, I decided it would be an interesting and challenging project to take photographs with a film camera that was made from the same era, circa 1918.

The Kodak No2 Folding Autographic Brownie is a beautifully made iconic Kodak folding type camera that only has two settings, aperture and shutter speed. But then again, what more do you need? Kodak made millions of these and similar cameras in the pre and post war period.

I first went down on the Friday evening and was introduced to Ajay by the official event photographer, Alex Bamford. Working at night with a folding camera with a very dim mirror viewfinder is tricky as you cannot compose the image at all, it’s just lining up the camera with a fingers crossed strategy.”